4 Things Your Support Team Should Do In Chat

iStock-1150182791.jpg

I’ve designed start-up chat support for banks, libraries, consulting companies, medical practices, and contact centers. When I set up a chat platform for my clients, I have two goals. First, I want to deliver a fast and complete support experience. Meaning, I want to answer the customer’s questions and solve any issues. And second, I want zero customer frustration. That means, customers shouldn’t have to escalate to get help, they shouldn’t have to move to a call or email, and delays should be minimal.

Here are four things I insist upon when I implement a chat support channel with my customers.

1. Screen Recordings and Screenshots

When an eLearning customer reaches out to my team for help over chat, we’ll go into the client’s customized portal to see what they see. Then, we’ll do quick screenshots or screen recordings to walk them through the steps to solve their issues.

Yesterday when an eLearning customer asked how to add certification from my Telephone Skills class to her LinkedIn profile, I did a quick screen record (shown below) and sent it to her.

customers love quick screen recordings. We don’t always add audio to these recordings. It’s usually enough just to send customers a link to watch the video instantly.

2. Check for Understanding

I tell my team never to assume they understand what the customer is saying and to instead, merely ask the customer what they mean. In our chats, check-ins read like this.

“You’re asking me how your employees can add an avatar to their eLearning profile, correct?”

“You want to de-activate a license because an employee is on medical leave, right?”

We allow the customer to clarify, so we’re all on the same page.

3. Short or No Queue 

When customers reach out to you for help over chat, there’s a sense of urgency. Staff your chat support so that customers wait no longer than five minutes.

4. No transfers

When your live chat button appears on a support page, you need to take customers straight to a support specialist. Don’t waste their time by sending them to sales or service. Make sure the pipeline goes to experts who can troubleshoot and answer questions.

The chat experience should be fast, easy, and it has to answer questions or solve problems. Anything else is a waste of time (the customers and yours) and resources.

Need More Help with Chat?

If your chat professionals need help with tone or grammar in chat interactions, you should check out my Chat eLearning class, which is part of my Customer Service eLearning library.

My Chat training prepares chat agents to deliver the best possible customer experience in chat interactions. Your employees learn everything from grammar in chat, to how to use the right language to build rapport, to how to deliver bad news in a chat.

The outcome of this training is agents who can serve customers in chat in a way that is friendly, grammatically excellent, and to handle issues in a single chat interaction. Learn more about my chat training here.