Author: myragolden

Myra is a favorite training partner to Fortune 500 companies with her customized, engaging, behavior-changing (and fun) customer service workshops, working with McDonald’s, Coca-Cola, Frito-Lay, Michelin, Vera Bradley and other brands.
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Managers Are Usually to Blame for Escalations

Customers are shrewd and impatient. They’re not going to mess around with a customer service employee who feigns (or lacks) authority to resolve issues. Customers will put their “get me a manager” card on the table in a hair’s breadth. And managers get frustrated with this, but it’s your fault, managers. You teach customers to escalate by holding all the power in your headsets.

4 Things Your Support Team Should Do In Chat

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I’ve designed start-up chat support for banks, libraries, consulting companies, medical practices, and contact centers. When I set up a chat platform for my clients, I have two goals. First, I want to deliver a fast and complete support experience. Meaning, I want to answer the customer’s questions and solve any issues. And second, I want zero customer frustration. That means, customers shouldn’t have to escalate to get help, they shouldn’t have to move to a call or email, and delays should be minimal.

Here are four things I insist upon when I implement a chat support channel with my customers.

1. Screen Recordings and Screenshots

When an eLearning customer reaches out to my team for help over chat, we’ll go into the client’s customized portal to see what they see. Then, we’ll do quick screenshots or screen recordings to walk them through the steps to solve their issues.

Yesterday when an eLearning customer asked how to add certification from my Telephone Skills class to her LinkedIn profile, I did a quick screen record (shown below) and sent it to her.

customers love quick screen recordings. We don’t always add audio to these recordings. It’s usually enough just to send customers a link to watch the video instantly.

2. Check for Understanding

I tell my team never to assume they understand what the customer is saying and to instead, merely ask the customer what they mean. In our chats, check-ins read like this.