The “Feel, Felt, Found” Method for Empathy

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Today I’m going to show you how to use the Feel, Felt, Found method to express empathy to your customers. What’s great about the Feel, Felt, Found Method is it gives you the perfect response when you can’t give the customer exactly what they want. It helps you to be more relatable, and to foster a sense of connection with customers.

The Feel, Felt, Found method is easy to use.

First, you let the customer know you can relate to how they feel.

Then, you explain to your customer that you’ve had other customers who have felt the same way. This helps your customer to realize two things: first, that you get how they are feeling and also, that they aren’t alone. Other customers have been where they are.

And finally, you tell the customer what you, or other customers, have found to work in this situation. This is where you offer empathy and a possible solution, all in one.

The basic model for Feel, Felt, Found is:

Continue reading “The “Feel, Felt, Found” Method for Empathy”

4 Things Customer Service Agents Can Do to Convey Empathy to Customers

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In this article I show you what empathy is using an experience with my teenage daughter, and then I deliver 4 tactical ideas you can apply right now to express empathy: Put yourself in your customer’s place, Sense the Situation From the Customer’s Perspective, Discuss What’s Upsetting the Customer, and Coming Up with Ways to Fix the Problem

My daughter and I were in New York. We’d spent the day sight-seeing, and back at the hotel, my daughter’s iPhone showed all of her photos as blurry – not just the photos she’d taken that day, but every picture on her phone.

To my 17-year old daughter, a problem with photos and her phone camera is catastrophic. It would have been easy for me to dismiss this as, “There are bigger things in life for you to worry about.” And that was my real temptation. But I could see she was distraught over this.

Empathy is putting yourself in another person’s place. Sensing their situation, from their perspective. It’s also discussing the things that are upsetting to the person, maybe coming up with ideas to get them out of the situation they’re in.

So, instead of dismissing my daughter’s photo problem as no big deal (because to me, it wasn’t a big deal), I chose empathy. Continue reading “4 Things Customer Service Agents Can Do to Convey Empathy to Customers”

This is How You Communicate Empathy to Customers

4 Attributes of Empathy

There are four attributes of empathy, and I teach each of these characteristics in my Empathy eLearning course. One of the characteristics is communicate your understanding.

When your customer is upset, or frustrated, you could communicate your understanding this way: Continue reading “This is How You Communicate Empathy to Customers”

7 Things You Can Say to Demonstrate Empathy to Customers

How to Express Empathy

One of the skills we practice in my onsite customer service workshops is Empathy. Here are some of the exact phrases that I share in my training sessions for use in our role-plays – and in real life with customers.

Continue reading “7 Things You Can Say to Demonstrate Empathy to Customers”

The Best Advice I’ve Ever Heard For Getting Customer Service Reps to Convey Empathy

Smiling Telephone Operator

Two years ago I was working with a company to help their customer service representatives convey empathy to customers. The intended outcome of the training was for employees to speak to customers with care, concern, and compassion.

Achieving empathy in the customer experience is a bit like walking a tightrope. Too much empathy can result in longer talk times and inappropriate sharing between customer service representatives and clients. Not enough understanding and reps can sound cold and uncaring.

You have to find the right balance in empathy. Or else you fall off the rope, and the customer experience is negatively impacted.

I asked my client how she saw appropriate empathy in her company. And here’s what she said.

Continue reading “The Best Advice I’ve Ever Heard For Getting Customer Service Reps to Convey Empathy”

Personal journal entry: “The Fault In Our Stars”

The Fault In Our Stars

Journal Entry -June 27, 2014 Orlando

Lauren and I saw “The Fault In Our Stars” Wednesday night. She heard of the book through a movie trailer. Lauren insisted that we immediately get the book so she could read it before she saw the movie. She read the book through tears and anticipation in just one week. I love watching her read with aggression. When her hands hold a book she likes, reading becomes as necessary and natural as breathing.

Since she finished the book while we were on vacation, we decided to catch the movie right here in Orlando. The movie was great. No, great is the wrong word. The plot was brilliantly conceptualized. I “felt” the characters. I experienced true empathy for the pain, fight and reality of terminally ill cancer patients.

I cried and cried. I fought hard, at first, to hold back my tears. I suppose I didn’t want to ruin my makeup. Or, did I not want Lauren to see me feel hard emotion? Pretty quickly, though, I gave in to the emotion and let myself just be. All I wanted to “be” was sad and empathic. So I let go and cried some more. Intensely I cried. I’m certain it was an ugly cry. The movie was sad, enlightening, engaging, empathy-invoking.

I can’t find “the” right word to describe this movie. Lauren would find my struggle for the right word amusing, as I am always pressing her to be more specific and detailed in her communication.

Most impacting to me was how fully the terminally ill children in the movie lived. They laughed, hurt, loved, and struggled, just like me. Just like my children. They didn’t wallow in self-pity, unlike a lot of healthy people. They inspired me and gave me hope.

I know I saw “The Fault In Our Stars” at just the right time. Last week I took on Make-A-Wish Foundation as a client. This movie helps me understand on a deeper level just how profoundly impacting Wish Granters are to terminally ill children. No doubt, I will create even greater value for my client because of the glimpse into the lives of terminally ill children this movie gave me. Thank you Father, for the gift of this movie.

–Myra